Blood Test

What kind of information does it give us?

Patrick Quanten MD

Since the introduction of the blood test as a means of helping with the diagnosis of diseases the number of things tested for has dramatically increased as well as the number of so called routine tests. The latter are blood tests done in the event that there is nothing wrong and without the patient complaining. Still we find it necessary to do blood tests; first because it is only a little invasive and secondly because we believe it will render us very valuable information about our health. “Better be safe” is a phrase well worn in these circumstances. Although we pretend that having a blood test is such a minor thing to do, we cannot ignore the enormous cost all those tests amount to for the Health Service. This financial sacrifice we as a community make is justified by the fact that a normal result at least has “prevented” a disease in a way we couldn’t have done otherwise. Only by having a normal blood test can we be sure that we are healthy. Apparently!

As nobody actually seems to question the validity of test results I believe it worthwhile to examine the reality of blood tests. It always pays to ask some pertinent questions about behaviour and to carefully look at what is being done, rather than repeating the same headlines we learned somewhere else. If we truly want to learn we need to consciously take note of our own experiences above what someone else tells us. How do we interpret blood test results?

Every single thing that is tested for has what is known as a “normal range”. These figures indicate the lower and upper limits of what is normal. We didn’t find these limits in the Manual of Life that was handed to us when we entered this physical life. No, we invented them. We took a look at the test results of a whole bunch of people that we considered to be healthy and took the average of those results. Strange to notice that before we used blood tests to determine health we already decided who was healthy and who wasn’t! In which case the question arises: why do we need a blood test to tell us what we already know? And also, when there is a discrepancy between the two who decides which one is correct? Is the person that you have considered healthy still healthy even though the blood test result falls outside the limits set by humans, or is a person with complaints and a normal blood test completely healthy? We have decided that the blood test is much more valuable than any other sign. I say “we”, but actually it is the industry that benefits from us being ill that has made that decision . It is also that same industry that makes us depended upon them, gives them the power over us, as we no longer can determine ourselves whether or not we are healthy. So, the setting of artificial levels of normality limits our personal observations of life. We no longer are allowed to see “abnormal” blood levels and not react to them. The medical system calls it immoral not to treat any deviation away from their definition of normal.

Blood tests are said to show a clear picture of how the system operates and what organs are being strained or are overworked. If we find high levels of hormones we deduce that the gland that is producing these is overactive. If we find low levels of nutritional stuff such as minerals or vitamins we conclude that we need to supplement those. We see the results of our blood test as an indicator of how glands and organs work. Through them we decide which part of the body is failing, which activity we need to suppress and which we need to support. Let’s think about how that really works.

When we take blood we take it out of a vein, not an artery. Medical authorities tell us that arteries take the nutrients and oxygen to the cells of the body and veins return the used blood, low on oxygen and high in waste, back to the lungs for oxygenation and to the detoxifying organs for cleaning. This has three immediate consequences.

  • All nutrients we test for in our blood will give us a level after the cells have taken what they require. That means that when we find high levels the cells have only taken very little and with low levels they have satisfied themselves completely. There is no way to determine from that test whether or not the system is short of those nutrients just because the cells have taken all they needed. It is like finding the plates empty on the dinner table and concluding people are hungry.
  • When we find high levels of waste products we decide that the organ is not doing its job properly. However, the veins are suppose to carry the waste products away from the cells and when the organs are working hard they will produce more waste. This does not mean that it is not working well, it actually means that the cells are well capable of doing the job. It is like finding that a factory produces a lot of waste and deciding on that basis that it is malfunctioning.
  • The levels of hormones one finds in that blood sample is not the amount of hormones that come from the glands and is being carried to the cells for operational purposes. No, it is blood that comes away from the cells after their activity. In other words, the amount of hormones one finds in that blood sample suggests the number of hormones that the cells have produced themselves. Those hormones come directly from the cells as that is where the blood comes from via the capillaries.

What is the reason for this topsy-turvy looking world? What looks like a deficiency is in fact proof of good productivity and what looks like overproduction is in fact a slowed down activity. How can that be? Well, if the medical profession had taken notice of what their own researchers have find then they would have known since the early eighties that all cells produce everything they need when they need it. There is no centralised production unit for anything and no complicated distribution system that is responsible for keeping the whole system alive. The communication system is about waste management, not about nutrition. Every cell produces what it needs – hormones, proteins, vitamins, minerals, water, fat – by itself. The stimulus that tells the cell what to do is a vibrational impulse. Cells communicate with the outside world and with each other via vibration, energy waves. As a result of all those impulses the cells operate and function, thereby turning wave energy into physical activity. All activity also results in the production of waste and it is this waste that is taken away by the lymphatic fluid and the blood that runs through the capillaries and the veins. So, the blood in the veins is carrying the end result of the cellular activity; everything in it depicts the activity of the cells. The higher the found levels are the greater that kind of activity in the cells has been. The more glucose (sugar) we find the higher the energy use has been within the cells. The more thyroid hormones we find the higher the activity level of the cells, the more they are being pushed to keep active. The more liver markers we find the higher the liver activity within each cell, which does not indicate that the organ, the liver, can’t cope with the workload. Low levels indicate low cellular activity. Maybe because it is not needed, or because the cells can’t do it any longer. So, when a time of very low activity follows on from a time of very high activity and the stimulus level hasn’t changed then we know the cells are in trouble and can no longer cope with the demand. Whenever one expects a high level of cellular activity in a certain part of living and one finds low levels of that particular stuff in the blood we can for sure conclude that the person is in great trouble. Before that phase, recuperation is always possible as the cells are still responding to stimuli. Reduce the energetic pressure and the system will repair all.

If the veins are carrying the cell’s waste products then surely those will vary throughout the body as not all cells do the same work at the same time. This means that the place we obtain the blood sample from is going to give us different results through the body. Traditionally we take blood from the arm, at the level of the elbow or occasionally the wrist. The blood in those veins carry waste from the fingers, the hand and the forearm. From that blood sample we can deduce how the cells in that part of your body are doing. It gives us very little, certainly no direct, information on the activity of the cells in the abdomen, pelvic area or the legs. Doing a blood test this way to determine the liver or kidney function can never be very specific.

All the cells of the body basically get information from two different sources: general and local. The general information is the energy that tells the body in which environment it lives and how it can respond to it as a whole, in harmony. This means that, overall, all the cells of the body will show a certain level of activity and in order to determine this level via a blood test it would make little difference from which vein we had taken the blood sample. If the person lives under highly pressurised conditions then all the cells will show signs of this pressure. The local information may, however, change particular levels of waste according to what is happening in that area of the body. Local traumas will change cellular activity in certain areas, as will specific local demands on activity and pressure. Depending on where we took the blood sample the test results would then vary. We can conclude here that as long as the disease process is a local affair blood taken from your arm is unlikely to show any signs of it, resulting in the doctor declaring you perfectly healthy. We now know that by the time the cells in your hand and arm have changed their functional habits and show signs of a general illness your whole system is already ill and illness can no longer be contained locally. By now the whole energetic system is starting to fail!

The way we perform blood tests is another proof for cells providing in their own needs and the variations we notice in that activity indicate energetic impulses that drive such activity. High or low levels of certain elements are the result of what the cells have been doing but to judge a certain level as being too high or too low is a human activity. As far as the cells are concerned the levels are always “right” because they are the direct result of the energetic impulses that triggered the activity. The levels are an indicator; there is no “good” or “bad” in them as such. Judging the level happens when a human tells us what he/she wants it to be. Nature does what it needs to do, without asking permission from that human. The chances are that if one of them is wrong it will be the human, not the cell; it will be the judgement, not the activity itself. And if that is the case it would be wise to allow the cell to do whatever it needs to do, without interference.

However laboratories decide to “measure” certain levels, it is always expressed in figures indicating the height of these levels. Apart from the fact that how we measure has great bearings on the result of the test, as Einstein taught us, the interpretation of the expression of our measurement is still another variable. Any thoughts that we attach to the figures we see in front of us are detached from reality as it exists for the cells. They don’t think like we do, and they have no incentive to justify to us their behaviour. It is as it is, because it has to be that way, given the circumstances in which they operate. If we are smart and we want to “help” them then we would endeavour to change those circumstances, rather than to try to interfere with the cellular function.

Maybe it shows that when we take a close look at how we perform blood tests and interpret them, the value of it all can easily be questioned. Maybe whether or not you are healthy does not need to be determined by that kind of blood test. Maybe it is an extremely poor way to detect disease at an early stage. Maybe the definition of disease and malfunctioning is not as we have been told, and it is time to revalue our interpretation of the results of tests we conduct.

Blood test, a useful tool in healthcare or just a way to withdraw personal power away from you and to keep you believing you are ill?

August 2013


Patrick Quanten has been a general practitioner since 1983. The combination of medical insight and extensive studies of Complementary Therapies have opened new perspectives on health care, all of which came to fruition when it blended with Yogic and Ayurvedic principles. Patrick gave up his medical licence in November 2001.
Patrick also holds qualifications in Ayurvedic Medicine, Homeopathy, Reiki, Ozon Therapy and Thai Massage. He is an expert on Ear Candling and he is also well-read in the field of other hard sciences. His life's work involves finding similarities between the Ancient Knowledge and modern Western science.

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